Reactions to the Midterm Election

10Nov06

Below are some snippits of reactions to the 2006 Midterm Election. (Ranging from clips from newspapers to personal anecdotes.)

  • “Having written off American voters as ignorant dorks for getting it wrong two years ago, the world has been gracious enough to admit them back into the fold of intelligent human beings. […] When news broke that Donald Rumsfeld had been fired, the joy was undiluted. Democrats win and Rumsfeld goes. It was almost enough to make them all believe in a God again.” –G. Baker of the Times.
  • “Guys… Rumsfeld is stepping down! Yay!” (fellow student)
  • “… yeah, I hate that guy.” (another student)
  • “A German radio station yesterday reported that Rumsfeld had
    been “sent to the desert” in their evening news.”
  • “I would have liked Al Gore to win. I like his name. Gore.”
  • “It would be poetry of a kind had Tony Blair’s exit been accompanied by George W sloping off too. In the real world, we’ll make do with Rumsfeld, absolute acknowledgement at last from the White House of the utter failure of their policy.” … “Yet the midterm elections ought to have a big effect on British politics, and all to the good. London has been polluted for long enough by the backwash from bad Pentagon decisions.” … “The political establishment continued to insist that the British prime minister always had to stay close to the president because of his awesome potency. Well, that excuse has gone. Bush has been castrated. The new players are Democrats, the very people Brown is naturally closest to, and we can see the early glimmerings of a new political mood all over.” J. Ashley of The Guardian.
  • “Thank you, America.” Title of an article in The Guardian. Aselected paragraph: “In US domestic terms, the 2006 midterms bring to an end the 12 intensely divisive years of Republican House rule that began under Newt Gingrich in 1994. These have been years of zealously and confrontational conservative politics that have shocked the world and, under Mr Bush, have sent America’s global standing plummeting. That long political hurricane has now at last blown itself out for a while, but not before leaving America with a terrible legacy that includes climate-change denial, the end of biological stem-cell research, an aid programme tied to abortion bans, a shockingly permissive gun culture, an embrace of capital punishment equalled only by some of the world’s worst tyrannies, the impeachment of Bill Clinton and his replacement by a president who does not believe in Darwin’s theory of evolution. The approval by voters in at least five more states of same-sex marriage bans – on top of 13 similar votes in 2004 – shows that culture-war politics are far from over.”
  • “The ugly American mark two is dead. Overnight six years of glib European identification of “American” with right-wing fundamentalism is over. The gun-toting, pre-Darwinian Bushite, the Tomahawk-wielding, Halliburton-loving, Beltway neo-con, damning abortion as murder and torturing Islamo-fascists has been lain to rest, and by a decision of the American people. Americans should be proud and the world should take note.” –S. Jenkins in The Guardian
  • “America thinks itself good at war and is bad at it. America thinks itself bad at democracy and is good at it, very good.” S. Jenkins in The Guardian.
  • “The midterm elections have left America’s policy on Iraq in a state of confusion. […] The newly resurgent Democrats will have a profound influence on what happens now, too. They must decide whether to pursue a bipartisan approach to Iraq or increase the pressure on the Republican administration in preparation for the 2008 presidential elections. But if Washington’s senators, congressmen and policymakers have any sense of responsibility they will divert their attention from matters of domestic advantage, and concentrate on the interests of the Iraqi people.” Leading article of The Independent.
  • “Everything’s different now – and suddenly supporters of the war are anti-American. Imagine the authority that Blair would have acquired if he had dared to oppose the invasion.” … “Tony Blair is the other loser in the US midterm elections. Labour’s record election winner is in the contorted position of being undermined by the electoral recovery of the Democrats.”… “Indeed, watching the electoral humiliation of the Bush regime from a British television screen was in itself a humiliating experience.” S. Richards in The Independent.
  • “We worry about staying alive, not about the outcome of elections in the US or whether Saddam Hussein lives or dies.” Quote from P. Cockburn’s article in The Independent.
  • “Tony Blair must be profoundly relieved that Britain’s unwritten constitution does not provide for mid-term elections.” From leading article titled “Bush’s adversity could be Browns opportunity” in the Telegraph.
  • “For liberals: America remains a very, very, conservative country. In a year that many called “the worst Republican environment since Watergate”, the GOP lost fewer than half as many seats as the Democrats lost in 1994.” D. Frum in The Telegraph.
  • “Has Nancy had a nip and tuck?” T. Harnden on a Telegraph blog.
  • “Despite last night’s massive victory for Democrats, George W. Bush will remain president for another two years.” An astute observation by T. Harnden on a Telegraph blog.
  • “You voted for Arnold?!?
  • “This is one of the reasons why I’m reluctant to apply to Berkeley… Schwarzenegger is governor.”
  • “They should vote for Samuel L. Jackson for governor. ‘Say what again!!’ “


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